The Kuiburi Wildlife Conservation Project | WWF

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The Kuiburi Wildlife Conservation Project

© © WWF-Greater Mekong / Wayuphong Jitvijak

In 2018 the Kuiburi Wildlife Conservation Project collaborated with the DNP and WCS to improve monitoring of tigers and other wildlife in Kaeng Krachan National Park, the largest national park in Thailand. Camera traps were installed in sixteen locations and 32 species of mammal were identified, including pangolin (CR), tiger, tapir, Asian elephant, and dhole (EN), leopard, Asiatic black bear, and gaur (VU), golden jackal, red muntjac, leopard cat (LC), Asiatic golden cat (NT) and Fea’s muntjac, and mouse deer (DD) according to the IUCN Red List.

WHAT ARE WE DOING ?

Kuiburi Wildlife Conservation Project collaborated with the DNP and WCS to improve monitoring of tigers and other wildlife in Kaeng Krachan National Park, the largest national park in Thailand. Camera traps were installed in sixteen locations and 32 species of mammal were identified.
 

HOW DO WE DO THIS ?

Camera traps
In 2018, the Kuiburi Wildlife Conservation Project collaborated with the DNP and WCS to improve monitoring of tigers and other wildlife in Kaeng Krachan National Park, the largest national park inThailand. Camera traps were installed in sixteen locations and 32 species of mammal were identified, including pangolin (CR), tiger, tapir, Asian elephant,
and dhole (EN), leopard, Asiatic black bear, and gaur (VU), golden jackal, red muntjac, leopard cat (LC), Asiatic golden cat (NT) and Fea’s muntjac, and mouse deer (DD) according to the IUCN Red List.

SMART Patrol
​SMART Patrol training was given to 50 forestofficials from Kaeng Krachan National Park, Kuiburi National Park, Chaloem Prakiat Thai Prachan National Park and Mai Nam Pachee Wildlife Sanctuary. This aims to create an effectiveness of patrolling tactics and also providing security for forest patrol officers. WWF is working in this forest complex alongside
WCS and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

In 2018 rangers in Kuiburi and Kaeng Krachan conducted 992 SMART Patrols on 1,157 days and 165 nights, covering an area of 13,841 kilometres or 71.73 percent of the national parks.